Cook Architecture has designed original and remodeled numerous mid-century homes over the past 45 years, starting from the time when mid-century modern was new-century modern. We have extensive experience in how to appropriately remodel classic modern structures in a manner that preserves the original design intent, yet updates such buildings to present standards. In addition, our mid-century expertise extends to interior design helping clients select appropriate furniture, art, artifacts, materials, and color selections that compliment such structures.

Preserving site and structure were paramount in the Goodman II renovation. Fearing the modest 1,200-square-foot original structure would be demolished by the high demand for land close to Washington D.C., Architects Michael Cook and Carlos Zubieta seized a rare opportunity to salvage a mid-century gem situated in Hammond Wood, a 58-home subdivision designed by Charles Goodman and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The design changes are limited to updating the kitchen area, relocating a door to the south elevation for backyard access, enlarging operable windows for life safety egress, updating surfaces, and installing energy saving components such as dual glazed windows and energy
saving gas heaters for more efficient energy use.

The house boasts one of the few remaining original interior wood partitions, with the original green stain that divides the kitchen and dining spaces. This partition is updated with solid-style mahogany shelving on the kitchen side, and the white formica surfaces with mahogany trim matches Goodman’s very own presentation table dating back to the 1950’s. A circular
theme is implemented in the design of the patio, walkways, and fire pit, all constructed from local carderock stone that glows in the southern exposure. The house boasts one of the few remaining original interior wood partitions, with the original green stain that divides the kitchen and dining spaces.